Important: This is general medical information, and is not tailored to the needs of a specific individual. This material is NOT complete. It does not cover all possible precautions, side effects, or interactions. You should always consult your physician when making decisions about your health. And you should consult your physician before starting or stopping medication.

When a person is struggling with both a mental illness and substance use disorder, it can be difficult to identify the issues and treat them both. Many treatment facilities focus solely on the symptoms of substance use, without treating the mental health issues that may contribute to addiction. Finding a center that specializes in co-occurring disorder treatment can help identify the roots of a substance use disorder and equip patients with the tools they need for lifelong recovery.
Alcohol is considered safe in moderation, but when occasional use becomes more common and begins to interfere with everyday life, it is typically classed as abuse. The UK Government’s guidelines on alcohol consumption states that no more than fourteen units of alcohol should be consumed by adult men and women each week; which means that consuming a large amount at one time (binge drinking), may still be considered abuse, without it being a regular occurrence.
Changes in the brain that support physical and psychological dependency on mind-altering substances are the direct cause of addiction, but those changes do not occur at random. Addiction experts believe drug addiction emerges from an interplay of genetic and environmental factors, although one factor or the other may be strong enough to make a person vulnerable to addiction in some instances.
In keeping with the idea of dual diagnosis, it is clear that a big part of alcohol rehabilitation is improving mental health. Even people not clinically diagnosed with co-occurring disorders suffer mentally under the control of alcohol. This is why depression and anxiety are both warning signs of alcohol abuse. The fact is that alcohol affects how the mind works; it affects the thoughts and emotions. Addiction and Recovery: A How to Guide | Shawn Kingsbury | TEDxUIdaho
The specific details and content of aftercare will vary from one facility to the next, but typically it comprises a participation in various therapy sessions on site, alongside phone sessions if and when required. The rehab will give you a bespoke recovery plan to take with you once you leave the facility which will include these aftercare sessions as well as recommendations for attendance at fellowship groups.
Alcohol is considered safe in moderation, but when occasional use becomes more common and begins to interfere with everyday life, it is typically classed as abuse. The UK Government’s guidelines on alcohol consumption states that no more than fourteen units of alcohol should be consumed by adult men and women each week; which means that consuming a large amount at one time (binge drinking), may still be considered abuse, without it being a regular occurrence.

Finding a drug rehab facility that has all of these features may seem difficult, but here at Axis, we provide everything on the list above and more. Our goal is to offer your loved one everything he or she needs to break free from drug and alcohol dependence and to go home with a plan that will help to continue to grow in recovery and remain true to his or her principles of sobriety. Starting with an evaluation and diagnostic process at intake, we create a treatment plan designed just for your loved one, complete with an intensive therapeutic schedule that comes with cutting-edge treatment options as well as traditional care and support.

Most people with a history of drug use have poor discipline and self-care habits. A critical part of self-care for a person in recovery is setting and accomplishing goals. Most people, whether in recovery or not, do not know how to set goals that are likely to be achieved. They begin with sincere intentions that eventually get abandoned because they didn’t approach goal setting with the proper mindset. The repetitive cycle of wanting to change habits but continually falling short gradually weakens a person’s resolve to the point where many stop trying.
Outpatient drug rehab provides patients with a more loosely defined schedule. This form of treatment allows patients to stay with their support system at home and maintain a limited presence at work or school. Both options offer patients a different range of therapeutic options and counseling with the goal of maintained abstinence and long-term recovery.
Professional assessments are always the best first step towards recovery, and they are especially important for anyone who feels they may have a problem with drinking. Since alcohol is legal, and drinking is culturally acceptable, many people who have an AUD (alcohol use disorder) might not realize the extent of their problem. A professional assessment is the only way to be sure.
The first step in addiction recovery is detox. The physical symptoms and withdrawal period varies depending on the drug abused, the length and the severity of drug addiction. Detoxing is not only about ridding the body of these “toxins” but also re-setting the neuro-chemistry of the brain that has been altered due to drug abuse. At Searidge Drug Rehab and Detox Centre, we work closely with our team of addiction treatment professionals to provide you with compassionate care by customising a detox program that works best for you.

In order to effectively address drug addiction as well as the co-occurring issues that may be underlying the problem, most patients will require residential or inpatient care. At a residential treatment program, the addicted patient will live at the treatment facility with access to 24-hour care and support that can be critical in helping them to avoid relapse in the early stages of recovery.
NOTE: This fact sheet discusses research findings on effective treatment approaches for drug abuse and addiction. If you’re seeking treatment, you can call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA's) National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (1-800-662-4357) or go to www.findtreatment.samhsa.gov for information on hotlines, counseling services, or treatment options in your state. 

Methamphetamine, or meth, is a chemical stimulant with effects that are similar to cocaine. Like cocaine, meth speeds up all of the body’s vital activities, including heart rate, breathing, and metabolism. But the rush of a meth high can last longer than the high of cocaine — up to half an hour, compared with several minutes for crack. Meth is sold as a white or crystalline powder that can be snorted, smoked, or injected. Powerfully addictive, meth can quickly lead the user into dependence and addiction. Meth users have been known to go on extended binges, using the drug for days or even weeks without stopping to sleep or eat.


With non-medical inpatient treatment, clients are still monitored throughout detoxification, and transition to addiction rehab — but with a reduced level of medical supervision and the absence of medication therapy. To find an outpatient program that works for you or your loved one, visit The Recovery Village’s substance abuse and recovery list, or use a search engine to find “outpatient drug rehab near me.”

Marijuana has become one of the most widely used — and abused — drugs in the United States. The Journal of the American Medical Association notes that while the prevalence of marijuana use in the US hasn’t changed much since the 1990s, the prevalence of cannabis abuse and addiction has greatly increased. The 2012 Monitoring the Future survey, which tracks drug use among American teens, showed that marijuana use has increased among high school students in recent years, while disapproval of cannabis among teens has declined. At one time, marijuana was not considered to be addictive, but recent studies have shown that this drug can cause symptoms of dependence and addiction, including cravings, insomnia, anxiety, depression, and agitation. 12 Steps of Recovery
Constantly evolving, Gateway Foundation uses evidence-based practices and leading experts to develop customized treatment plans for every patient. Drawing from proven research and a legacy of innovation, we deliver the best possible outcomes—advancing the recovery of thousands of patients and families every year. Gateway Foundation Treatment Centers provides:
Any drug overdose can be either accidental or intentional. Drug overdoses are the leading cause of death for Americans under 50. Accidental overdoses tend to happen when people take more of a prescription medication than originally intended to achieve certain results, or when they use too much of an illegal drug trying to get a better high. Intentional overdoses are usually a result of someone trying to commit suicide. Regardless of the intent, any loss of life due to an overdose is tragic and any overdose can have severe and lasting repercussions.

You won't be judged. It’s probably difficult for you to talk about your drinking, because you're afraid nobody will understand you and they'll criticize you. So you bottle everything up inside, which makes you feel more guilt and shame, and makes you want to drink even more. The people at a self-help group won't judge you because they've heard it all before. They've done it all before. They know you're not crazy. You're addicted.
With the Sinclair Method, people only take Revia or Vivitrol before drinking and never otherwise. Revia and Vivitrol are not like other anti-alcohol drugs that cause intense sickness and hangover sensations when taken with alcohol. The change in behavior only appears over time. With the Sinclair Method, Revia or Vivitrol is taken one hour before drinking alcohol. At the end of four to six months of treatment with the Sinclair Method, 80 percent of people who had been overusing alcohol are either drinking moderately or abstaining entirely. Transformations Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers
The method that’s proven to be most effective in treating alcohol addiction is to use medications alongside traditional behavioral therapy. However, medications are underutilized in alcohol addiction treatment, and many people are not even aware that they exist. Behavioral therapy involves individual or group counseling, and it equips addicts to overcome their addiction by giving them coping skills and addressing any other mental health needs.
Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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