Historically, drug addiction and those suffering with it were maligned as morally weak people who made bad choices. This pure behavioral model, however, fails to account for the biological changes that addiction triggers in the body and brain. Furthermore, it overlooks the issue of comorbidity; many people who are addicted to drugs also suffer from mental health problems and use drugs to self-medicate for those problems.


If a person is experiencing seizures and hallucinations when attempting to stop drinking, it may be due to a condition called delirium tremens (DTs). This is a serious condition that requires medical intervention to detox from alcohol. Because of the risk of DTs, a person struggling with alcoholism should never attempt to quit drinking altogether. In order to withdraw from alcohol, medical detox is required.


Caring for a person who has problems with alcohol can be very stressful. It is important that as you try to help your loved one, you find a way to take care of yourself as well. It may help to seek support from others, including friends, family, community, and support groups. If you are developing your own symptoms of depression or anxiety, think about seeking professional help for yourself. Remember that your loved one is ultimately responsible for managing his or her illness.

At Gateway Foundation, we employ a variety of addiction therapy services that aid in treatment. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, and Trauma Therapy are some of the most common that our therapists use to help patients begin on the road to recovery. Each of these treatments and therapies is part of a larger overall program, specifically designed for individual patient recovery at one of our 17 drug treatment centers. To speak to someone about treatment at a Gateway Foundation center, call 877.381.6538 today.


At Hazelden Betty Ford, your length of stay in inpatient alcohol or drug rehab will be based on your progress in meeting specific clinical milestones. Our clinical team will work with you and your family as well as your insurance provider to come up with the best timetable and plan for you. Just as addiction doesn’t happen in the course of a few weeks or months, it’s unrealistic to expect recovery to occur that quickly.
Many people and families in the United States do not have the extra income to pay for health care. Medicaid is set up for low-income families with little to no resources available to them. Medicaid is available to people of all ages who fit the criteria and are eligible for coverage. The program is funded by the state and the federal government and currently all of the states within the US participate in the program. Each state does not have to follow the eligibility criteria, specifically as to what is laid out. Each person applying must be a US citizen or a legal permanent resident, and this also applies to low income adults, their children, and persons with disabilities. Having a low income is not the only requirement needed for eligibility and coverage.

Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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