No matter where you are in your recovery, there is an addiction treatment center that can help you. For those just starting out and in need of medical treatment, alcohol detox may be the most appropriate. For those who have safely surmounted the challenge of acute alcohol withdrawal and have already made progress with the physical dependence associated with alcoholism, ongoing inpatient or outpatient alcohol rehab that offers therapy can help further the recovery journey.
Group counseling sessions– These involve meeting with other recovering addicts in the program. They provide opportunity for sharing life experiences and lessons learned.In so doing, a peer support network develops. Erroneous thinking and walls of isolation are exposed and addressed.3Aftercare– When individuals “graduate” from formal alcohol rehab, they return to the outside world. Oftentimes, it isn’t easy to make this switch. Treatment-energized hope may fade away over time. Day-to-day stresses can take their toll.Ongoing support through 12-Step meetings, personal and group therapies, holistic treatments and other supports are vital. They help to maintain what was learned and practiced in formal treatment.4

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), intervention meetings are different to more traditional alcoholism treatment programs. While this type of meeting is usually designed for a person who is on the cusp of developing an alcohol problem, they can also help motivate an alcoholic in to seeking more extensive treatment for their alcoholism. The best intervention meetings are usually those that both the alcoholic person and family can attend together. This allows the family to discuss how the individual's alcoholism has affected them as a unit. This is also a good setting for loved ones to strongly demand that the individual seek treatment, as they have the backup of professional counselors.
Many rehab patients continue to receive treatment for their addictions after leaving rehab. They may have regular clinic visits with a doctor to manage physical symptoms. Patients may also meet with a counselor on a regular, outpatient basis to refine coping skills. In addition to the love and support of family and friends, patients may also attend support group meetings after leaving a drug rehab treatment facility. All of these aftercare services help patients remain drug free and avoid relapse.
Because prescription drugs are produced in laboratories and prescribed by doctors, they are mistakenly perceived as “safer” than street drugs. However, the risks of overdose, respiratory depression, cardiac arrest, and accidental death are equal to any other opioid narcotic. Withdrawal can be extremely uncomfortable, with symptoms that resemble a bad flu, such as a runny nose, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches, shakiness, and cold sweats.
More problematically, they are also not removed from their home environment which has proven to facilitate the drug-taking behaviour which has led to addiction, and are still able to contact their dealer/s if the temptation to relapse proves overpowering. Their whole recovery rests upon their strength of will – which in some cases may not prove sufficient at critical times.

Dopamine is the neurotransmitter that is responsible for motivation and reward, and therefore it is a crucial neurotransmitter related to addiction. Drug abuse causes the release of surges of dopamine, and these in turn produce feelings of euphoria, followed by cravings, major reinforcement of the same behaviors, and compulsions to repeat whatever behavior produced the surge.
For example: As a result of heavy traffic, a recovering alcoholic may decide one afternoon to exit the highway and travel on side roads. This will result in the creation of a high-risk situation when he realizes he is inadvertently driving by his old favorite bar. If this individual is able to employ successful coping strategies, such as distracting himself from his cravings by turning on his favorite music, then he will avoid the relapse risk (PATH 1) and heighten his efficacy for future abstinence. If, however, he lacks coping mechanisms—for instance, he may begin ruminating on his cravings (PATH 2)—then his efficacy for abstinence will decrease, his expectations of positive outcomes will increase, and he may experience a lapse—an isolated return to substance intoxication. So doing results in what Marlatt refers to as the Abstinence Violation Effect, characterized by guilt for having gotten intoxicated and low efficacy for future abstinence in similar tempting situations. This is a dangerous pathway, Marlatt proposes, to full-blown relapse.
When you have a child struggling with substance abuse, attempting to handle it on your own can be extremely overwhelming and can eventually become your first and only priority. It may also be difficult to take the first step because addressing the problem is disruptive of school and extracurricular activities.2 However, addiction is far more disruptive to your child's life in the end, and treatment can work. Taking the time now to get help can save your child's life.
Lastly, drug rehab is important because it affords participants the opportunity to construct new habits. One of the more common characteristics of addicts is poor self-discipline and care. Rehab provides these individuals with the chance not only to set goals but to accomplish them as well. Routinely achieving goals provides addicts with an improved sense of self-worth and resolve.
Drugs, Addiction, and the Brain explores the molecular, cellular, and neurocircuitry systems in the brain that are responsible for drug addiction. Common neurobiological elements are emphasized that provide novel insights into how the brain mediates the acute rewarding effects of drugs of abuse and how it changes during the transition from initial drug use to compulsive drug use and addiction. The book provides a detailed overview of the pathophysiology of the disease. The information provided will be useful for neuroscientists in the field of addiction, drug abuse treatment providers, and undergraduate and postgraduate students who are interested in learning the diverse effects of drugs of abuse on the brain.
When it’s time to take action, finding the right drug rehab facility can become a daunting task. Most people turn to the internet with search engine inquiries like “rehab centers near me” or “local drug rehab.” Finding a center close by can be helpful, but your search may also offer results for programs that require travel. Inpatient drug rehab centers away from home can offer more opportunities for healing in a new environment.
Research the history of the Treatment Center or facility.  What is their success rate?  Can you find any medical recommendations for them online from members of the established rehab or medical community?  How long has the Center been in operation?  Is their leadership on solid ground?  Are there any signs of financial corruption associated with the Center that is readily visible on the Internet?  It is your responsibility to dig for this information.  If you cannot find any information about a given Treatment Center online or at your local library, move on to the next Center on your list! 3 Stages of Drug Alcohol Rehab-How It Works
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