If you’ve noticed the signs or symptoms of drug addiction in someone you love, don’t hesitate to intervene. Many people are reluctant to talk to a friend or family member about drug addiction, either because they’re afraid of jumping to conclusions, or because they don’t want to make the problem worse. Although it’s never easy or comfortable to bring up the topic of substance abuse, reaching out to an addict could stop the progression of a fatal disease. Here are a few steps you can take to communicate your concerns, while protecting yourself and your loved ones from the repercussions of addiction:
Addiction is a complex but treatable condition. It is characterized by compulsive drug craving, seeking, and use that persists even if the user is aware of severe adverse consequences. For some people, addiction becomes chronic, with periodic relapses even after long periods of abstinence. As a chronic, relapsing disease, addiction may require continued treatments to increase the intervals between relapses and diminish their intensity. While some with substance issues recover and lead fulfilling lives, others require ongoing additional support. The ultimate goal of addiction treatment is to enable an individual to manage their substance misuse; for some this may mean abstinence. Immediate goals are often to reduce substance abuse, improve the patient's ability to function, and minimize the medical and social complications of substance abuse and their addiction; this is called "harm reduction". Best Drug Rehabilitation Graduation
Living on a limited income is challenging enough; having to deal with recovery from a drug or alcohol addiction on a limited income is even more so. Finding help with treatment can make ease some of this burden, and it can help those struggling with addiction to get their lives back. Once recovery is in progress, it can help to be surrounded by others who understand and who can help the recovering individual through the process, such as by participating in self-help groups and other counseling programs. Alcoholism - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
Drug addiction recovery is a long-term process, and those who attempt to overcome their drug problems must be prepared for a challenging struggle. In the end, persistence and determination will make all the difference, and if people recovering from substance use disorders are strong enough to stay the course, a happy, healthy, drug-free future will be within their grasp.
Alcohol Health & Research World notes that outpatient alcohol detox programs can be as safe and effective as inpatient detox, as long as the patients have been professionally screened and matched to the right level of care. With outpatient treatment, the average length of stay in rehab is usually shorter, and the cost is generally less. However, for patients at risk of serious alcohol withdrawal symptoms, or for those with co-occurring medical or psychiatric disorders, inpatient alcohol detox is often more appropriate.

Addiction is an all-consuming disease, using much of an individual’s time, energy and resources. There are many physical, mental and emotional signs of addiction. If you or a loved one are experiencing a combination of these signs, treatment may be a stepping stone for long-term recovery. Looking for signs and symptoms of drug abuse can be the first step toward identifying an addiction:
It is not just the addict who suffers from addiction: those around them, especially family members, can be profoundly affected too. Some good rehabs have a strong focus on the family, in terms both of the role the family can play in an addict’s recovery, and of the recovery of the family members themselves who may have experienced great distress and even trauma as a result of their loved one’s addiction.
The length of a rehab program can vary greatly, and largely depends on the needs of each individual. For some, a weekly outpatient program may suffice, while others may participate in inpatient care that lasts on average 30–40 days. You may ask yourself, “How does rehab work?” Like many things in life, long-term recovery is usually achieved with time and dedication. For some, this may include long-term inpatient drug rehab that involves staying on-site for an extended period of time. This can help some clients better regulate their recovery needs for sustained sobriety. These types of programs may also include sober living housing, which provides patients with a stable place to live while transitioning back into normal life.
Cost may be a factor when selecting a treatment approach. Evaluate the coverage in your health insurance plan to determine how much of the costs your insurance will cover and how much you will have to pay. Ask different programs if they offer sliding scale fees — some programs may offer lower prices or payment plans for individuals without health insurance.
Also known as Spice or K2, synthetic marijuana is a manufactured substance that contains an ingredient similar to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) – the active ingredient in marijuana. Because synthetic marijuana can be purchased legally, many people believe it is a safer alternative to marijuana. However, synthetic marijuana is dangerously addictive and can produce psychoactive effects that are just as strong as its natural counterpart.
According to SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 22.5 million people (8.5 percent of the U.S. population) aged 12 or older needed treatment for an illicit* drug or alcohol use problem in 2014. Only 4.2 million (18.5 percent of those who needed treatment) received any substance use treatment in the same year. Of these, about 2.6 million people received treatment at specialty treatment programs (CBHSQ, 2015). Russell Brand Speaks Candidly About His Addictions & Recovery
At Costa Rica Treatment Center we ensure that every aspect of our client’s stay is delivered at the highest standard of professional care. We pride ourselves in offering the highest staff to patient ratio in the region. Our multidisciplinary team is comprised of Psychiatrists, Psychologists, Family Therapists, Trauma Specialists, Counselors, Art Therapists, Yoga Teachers, Life Coaches, Social Workers, Occupational Therapists, and Recovery Mentors. Collectively, our team is responsible for creating the client’s individual addictions treatment plan.

Inpatient addiction treatment focuses on stabilization and assessment of your health to ensure you are ready--physically, psychologically and emotionally--to learn about core recovery concepts and to begin practicing recovery principles. Each day, you will be given a schedule of treatment activities, appointments and services tailored to meet your specific recovery needs and goals. Learn more about what happens in a typical day of inpatient addiction treatment.
Changes in the brain that support physical and psychological dependency on mind-altering substances are the direct cause of addiction, but those changes do not occur at random. Addiction experts believe drug addiction emerges from an interplay of genetic and environmental factors, although one factor or the other may be strong enough to make a person vulnerable to addiction in some instances.
Inpatient or residential treatment is the most intensive level of care, with round-the-clock monitoring and clinical management to alleviate withdrawal symptoms and provide structure. After the detox phase, the patient lives at the facility full-time while receiving therapy, group counseling, medication management, holistic therapies and other services.
If you or someone you care about is struggling with an alcohol problem help is out there. There are many treatment options, from inpatient rehab to outpatient counseling and support groups. Just because a problem has developed doesn’t mean it has to stay a problem. Get treatment for your alcohol addiction right now and start taking your life back from this disorder.
An individual who suffers from both mental illness and alcoholism will need to undergo different treatment. Because alcohol withdrawal symptoms cause a person to experience some psychiatric stress, an alcoholic with mental health issues will find it much more difficult to resist turning to drink. The NIAAA believes the some self-help groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, are not effective when it comes to treating people with a dual-diagnosis of both alcoholism and mental illness. This is because these groups tend to specifically focus on the actual addiction itself, rather than any underlying psychological problems. Anti-depressants are improving all the time and it is believed that while a self-help group may not be useful for a dual-diagnosis individual by itself, if the individual is on the appropriate medication and receiving the appropriate psychological therapy it can prove to be just as effective as with other alcoholic individuals.

Addiction is a chronic disease characterized by drug seeking and use that is compulsive, or difficult to control, despite harmful consequences. The initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, but repeated drug use can lead to brain changes that challenge an addicted person’s self-control and interfere with their ability to resist intense urges to take drugs. These brain changes can be persistent, which is why drug addiction is considered a "relapsing" disease—people in recovery from drug use disorders are at increased risk for returning to drug use even after years of not taking the drug. Kevin's Struggle with Alcohol | True Stories of Addiction | Detox to Rehab


In order to effectively address drug addiction as well as the co-occurring issues that may be underlying the problem, most patients will require residential or inpatient care. At a residential treatment program, the addicted patient will live at the treatment facility with access to 24-hour care and support that can be critical in helping them to avoid relapse in the early stages of recovery.
Your first step is to call our Patient Access Team for a confidential phone assessment. You will talk with a recovery expert who will determine whether drug or alcohol treatment is needed and, if it is, will recommend the appropriate level of care and work with you to coordinate insurance benefits. If alcohol or drug addiction is not clearly indicated or if you’re not ready to commit to an inpatient stay, you can learn more about your situation and possible next steps by participating in one of our residential evaluation programs. Residential evaluations typically involve a four-day stay at one of our treatment centers where a number of screenings and assessments will help to identify your particular needs and challenges. Drug Rehab Nc | What Is Rehab Like? | Drug Rehabilitation Centers Near Me
To ensure that you feel as comfortable as possible on your journey to recovery, Priory offers a free drug addiction assessment with one of our addictions experts, allowing you to discuss your concerns in confidence, receive guidance on the next steps in the drug addiction treatment process, and begin to develop an understanding of the journey that you will be taking towards drug rehabilitation and recovery. You will also undergo a consultation with a consultant psychiatrist, who will gather information on your medical and psychiatric history and advise on future treatment. We are also able to offer a comprehensive medically assisted withdrawal detoxification process for your drug addiction, if this is required.
Substance abuse has plagued the nation for decades. This has prompted the need for rehab centers, but these facilities must first consider the dynamics of drug and alcohol abuse to effectively treat it. For example, a man who’s been struggling with severe alcoholism for five years will likely need a different form of treatment than a woman who’s been abusing alcohol for only a few months. This is why drug rehab centers like The Recovery Village offer individualized inpatient and outpatient rehab programs — including inpatient detox — to allow them to accommodate the varying needs of patients.
If you’ve noticed the signs or symptoms of drug addiction in someone you love, don’t hesitate to intervene. Many people are reluctant to talk to a friend or family member about drug addiction, either because they’re afraid of jumping to conclusions, or because they don’t want to make the problem worse. Although it’s never easy or comfortable to bring up the topic of substance abuse, reaching out to an addict could stop the progression of a fatal disease. Here are a few steps you can take to communicate your concerns, while protecting yourself and your loved ones from the repercussions of addiction:
One of many recovery methods are 12-step recovery programs, with prominent examples including Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Drug Addicts Anonymous[29] and Pills Anonymous. They are commonly known and used for a variety of addictions for the individual addicted and the family of the individual. Substance-abuse rehabilitation (rehab) centers offer a residential treatment program for some of the more seriously addicted, in order to isolate the patient from drugs and interactions with other users and dealers. Outpatient clinics usually offer a combination of individual counseling and group counseling. Frequently, a physician or psychiatrist will prescribe medications in order to help patients cope with the side effects of their addiction. Medications can help immensely with anxiety and insomnia, can treat underlying mental disorders (cf. self-medication hypothesis, Khantzian 1997) such as depression, and can help reduce or eliminate withdrawal symptomology when withdrawing from physiologically addictive drugs. Some examples are using benzodiazepines for alcohol detoxification, which prevents delirium tremens and complications; using a slow taper of benzodiazepines or a taper of phenobarbital, sometimes including another antiepileptic agent such as gabapentin, pregabalin, or valproate, for withdrawal from barbiturates or benzodiazepines; using drugs such as baclofen to reduce cravings and propensity for relapse amongst addicts to any drug, especially effective in stimulant users, and alcoholics (in which it is nearly as effective as benzodiazepines in preventing complications); using clonidine, an alpha-agonist, and loperamide for opioid detoxification, for first-time users or those who wish to attempt an abstinence-based recovery (90% of opioid users relapse to active addiction within eight months or are multiple relapse patients); or replacing an opioid that is interfering with or destructive to a user's life, such as illicitly-obtained heroin, dilaudid, or oxycodone, with an opioid that can be administered legally, reduces or eliminates drug cravings, and does not produce a high, such as methadone or buprenorphine – opioid replacement therapy – which is the gold standard for treatment of opioid dependence in developed countries, reducing the risk and cost to both user and society more effectively than any other treatment modality (for opioid dependence), and shows the best short-term and long-term gains for the user, with the greatest longevity, least risk of fatality, greatest quality of life, and lowest risk of relapse and legal issues including arrest and incarceration.[citation needed]

Even if you are aware of the harm that prolonged heavy drinking causes to the body, you will tend to believe that you would never let it get to that stage because you would be sure to stop long before then. But the truth is that drinking causes great harm to the body long before you can see the effects, and the most serious consequences might not be that far off. An idea of the extent of the negative health impacts of drinking can be seen in the NHS finances, which show that alcohol consumption is responsible for over 10% of the cost of healthcare in Britain. Beatings and addiction: Pakistan drug 'clinic' tortures patients
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