FAQAre alcohol rehabs private and confidential?Is there an ideal length of rehab?What does treatment include?What are the factors I should look for in a rehab programme?How much does treatment cost?Are there treatment programmes for teens?How do you know if you’re addicted to alcohol?How do clinicians recommend duration of stay?Does insurance cover alcohol treatment?How does alcohol rehab work?How effective is alcohol rehab?
Within the framework of the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is redefined as a drug addiction, and can be diagnosed without the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome.[6] It was described accordingly: "When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped. This, along with Substance Abuse are considered Substance Use Disorders."[7] In the DSM-5 (released in 2013), substance abuse and substance dependence have been merged into the category of substance use disorders and they no longer exist as individual diagnosis.[8] Russel Brand on Addiction and the 12 Step Program
As with treatment for most substance abuse problems, there are two angles to treating an alcohol problem. The first step is to break the physical dependence on alcohol. As mentioned above, cutting off alcohol after developing an addiction to it can cause withdrawal symptoms that could be severe enough to drive a patient back to drinking. For that reason, the detoxification process of treatment often involves the careful administration of drugs like anti-anxiety drugs to help wean the patient off their dependence on alcohol and through the process of acclimatizing to life without alcohol.
People who misuse alcohol are often addicted to the act of drinking, as much as the alcohol itself. For that reason, you may need to learn skills and coping mechanisms to help you avoid alcohol once you leave a treatment center or return to familiar environments where the urge to drink may be stronger. Your doctor may refer you to a counselor or other treatment program to help you learn those skills and coping strategies.
At Michael’s House, we offer a holistic alcohol rehab experience designed to meet the individual needs of each patient on a personal level. An alcohol rehab center should be a place for healing, healthier living, and emotional and therapeutic support. The treatment programs that have enjoyed the most success in helping their patients heal after alcohol addiction are those that contain a variety of evidence-based strategies to enrich the mind, body and soul of the individual.1
Support groups provide people with understanding peers and ongoing support, in church basements, community centers, and public facilities scattered all across the country. Here, people can come together to discuss addiction’s difficulties, and they can meet with other addicted people to gain support and insight. Alumni groups are similar, in that they link peers together to discuss addiction, but these groups contain people who all worked within the same facility for help. Overcoming Addiction ► How To Prevent Relapse
When it’s time to take action, finding the right drug rehab facility can become a daunting task. Most people turn to the internet with search engine inquiries like “rehab centers near me” or “local drug rehab.” Finding a center close by can be helpful, but your search may also offer results for programs that require travel. Inpatient drug rehab centers away from home can offer more opportunities for healing in a new environment.
When a person is struggling with both a mental illness and substance use disorder, it can be difficult to identify the issues and treat them both. Many treatment facilities focus solely on the symptoms of substance use, without treating the mental health issues that may contribute to addiction. Finding a center that specializes in co-occurring disorder treatment can help identify the roots of a substance use disorder and equip patients with the tools they need for lifelong recovery.

Nitrous oxide, also sometimes known as laughing gas, is a legally available gas used for purposes that include anesthesia during certain dental and surgical procedures, as well as food preparation and the fueling of rocket and racing engines. Substance abusers also sometimes use the gas as an inhalant. Like all other inhalants, it's popular because it provides consciousness-altering effects while allowing users to avoid some of the legal issues surrounding illicit or illegal drugs of abuse. Abuse of nitrogenous oxide can produce significant short-term and long-term damage to human health, including a form of oxygen starvation, called hypoxia, brain damage, and a serious vitamin B12 deficiency that can lead to nerve damage. Drug and Alcohol Addiction - "Audio Rehab" - Brainwave Entrainment Music Therapy
"The most robust finding in the study is that those receiving any medication did much better than those who received no pills at all," says Professor Barbara Mason, Scripps Research Institute, and an author of the study. "This should be a wake-up call. With less than one percent of those seeking help for alcohol dependence receiving a prescription, medication is underutilized. Medication for alcoholism can offer patients an advantage for their recovery, especially in a real-world setting." Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Treatment With Alcohol Ablation

Drug addiction recovery is a long-term process, and those who attempt to overcome their drug problems must be prepared for a challenging struggle. In the end, persistence and determination will make all the difference, and if people recovering from substance use disorders are strong enough to stay the course, a happy, healthy, drug-free future will be within their grasp.
Psychoanalysis, a psychotherapeutic approach to behavior change developed by Sigmund Freud and modified by his followers, has also offered an explanation of substance abuse. This orientation suggests the main cause of the addiction syndrome is the unconscious need to entertain and to enact various kinds of homosexual and perverse fantasies, and at the same time to avoid taking responsibility for this. It is hypothesized specific drugs facilitate specific fantasies and using drugs is considered to be a displacement from, and a concomitant of, the compulsion to masturbate while entertaining homosexual and perverse fantasies. The addiction syndrome is also hypothesized to be associated with life trajectories that have occurred within the context of teratogenic processes, the phases of which include social, cultural and political factors, encapsulation, traumatophobia, and masturbation as a form of self-soothing.[39] Such an approach lies in stark contrast to the approaches of social cognitive theory to addiction—and indeed, to behavior in general—which holds human beings to regulate and control their own environmental and cognitive environments, and are not merely driven by internal, driving impulses. Additionally, homosexual content is not implicated as a necessary feature in addiction.
As the brain matures, experiences prune excess neural connections while strengthening those that are used more often. Many scientists think that this process contributes to the steady reduction in gray matter volume seen during adolescence (depicted as the yellow to blue transition in the figure). As environmental forces help determine which connections will wither and which will thrive, the brain circuits that emerge become more efficient. However, this is a process that can cut both ways because not all tasks are desirable. The environment is like an artist who creates a sculpture by chipping away excess marble; and just like bad artists can produce bad art, environments with negative factors (like drugs, malnutrition, bullying, or sleep deprivation) can lead to efficient but potentially harmful circuits that conspire against a person's well-being.
Alcoholism is an illness affecting millions of people around the world. If you do not suffer with it yourself, you may know someone who does. Contrary to what many people think, alcoholism does not target those with no willpower or who are morally weak. It is not something that affects ‘bad’ people. Alcoholism is a chronic illness that requires treatment.
We are active in supporting research into improving the lives of those struggling with addiction. Searidge Foundation and our sister rehab Sobriety Home located in Godmanchester, Quebec are highly regarded as the leading alcohol and drug rehab facilities in Canada. We support Florida State University (FSU) in their research into addiction and anxiety disorder. We are also involved with Dr. Brunet, of McGill University, and his leading scientific research on PTSD and addiction memory.

Withdrawal is medically supervised and supported by our on-site nurses. For certain cases, we make use of medical aids to render the process much easier and safer. For opiate withdrawals we use suboxone, and for Benzodiazepine withdrawal we follow a modified version of the Ashton protocol. Alcohol withdrawal is medically supervised and medication is given to eliminate the risk of seizure and stroke. We take every measure to ensure that this first, important stage towards drug addiction recovery is a comfortable and safe one. To find out more about the detox program at Searidge please call us at 1-866-777-9614. So... What is Rehab Like?
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