Mountainside treatment center is a relatively young treatment center founded in 1998. They claim to be one of the first centers to use a holistic approach to recovery alongside traditional methods of treatment. Treatment ranges from traditional 12-step programs to adventure-based counseling. Mountainside has a multidisciplinary, certified treatment staff with a reputation for being truly empathetic toward their patients.
The specific medicines prescribed will vary depending upon your own particular experience of withdrawal and the symptoms you are manifesting, and it may be that certain medications will not be appropriate depending on your substance of abuse or your own personal health history; an experienced medical professional will be able to make those decisions to ensure you go through withdrawal as safely as possible.

More good news is that drug use and addiction are preventable. Results from NIDA-funded research have shown that prevention programs involving families, schools, communities, and the media are effective for preventing or reducing drug use and addiction. Although personal events and cultural factors affect drug use trends, when young people view drug use as harmful, they tend to decrease their drug taking. Therefore, education and outreach are key in helping people understand the possible risks of drug use. Teachers, parents, and health care providers have crucial roles in educating young people and preventing drug use and addiction.
In the not so distant past, treatment for alcoholism would have required a person to stay in hospital for an unknown period of time. Today, a number of treatments for alcoholism exist that do not require a person to stay in hospital at all. There are lots of different types of programs, some involve the person committing for a couple of hours a day over several weeks, while others require up to 20 hours of attendance a week over an indefinite amount of time. If the person is considered low-risk, to both themselves and others, outpatient care under the supervision of a doctor is usually the best course of treatment. Inpatient programs usually take place in a physiatrist hospital, although some general hospitals run them too. There are lots of different types of programs, some involve the person committing for a couple of hours a day over several weeks. There are also specialist alcohol addiction treatment centers, which offer the same services as a hospital. Individuals who are usually recommended for inpatient treatment are usually those who are suffering severe withdrawals or who have had several failed rehabilitation attempts in the past. If the person suffers from a psychiatric disorder or comes from a family of alcoholics, inpatient care is usually a wise option. Inpatient care usually involves a medically supervised detoxification, which is managed with the use of medication. Cognitive behavioral therapy and an introduction to outside support groups are also an integral part of the alcoholism treatment. People who receive outpatient care will generally undergo the same treatment as those who are admitted for inpatient treatment, although the detoxification medication will vary.
Drug addiction recovery is a long-term process, and those who attempt to overcome their drug problems must be prepared for a challenging struggle. In the end, persistence and determination will make all the difference, and if people recovering from substance use disorders are strong enough to stay the course, a happy, healthy, drug-free future will be within their grasp.
Co-occurring conditions require specialised treatments that can safely address both aspects of a dual diagnosis. Doctors and therapists work to create effective but flexible treatment plans that account for both conditions without treating one at the expense of the other. The delicate balance necessary to achieve a positive outcome suggests that residential treatment is the better option for dealing with dual diagnosis scenarios.
With opiate abuse (heroin, morphine, OxyContin, Vicodin), withdrawal symptoms usually start within a matter of hours and last for several days. With stimulants like cocaine or methamphetamine, withdrawal may be more extensive, with cravings, depression, and anxiety lasting for several months. Withdrawal from prescription medications, such as sedatives in the benzodiazepine family (Valium, Xanax, Ativan) may require a drug taper lasting a number of weeks to clear the chemical safely from your system. Drug Rehab Near Me
Drug rehab facilities help people to recover from substance use disorders. There are many different types of drug rehab facilities. Some specialize in helping patients with a specific drug addiction; others offer a broader range of drug addiction services. Some rehab facilities are even gender- or age-specific, as this often helps patients feel more comfortable in the rehab setting. Inpatient and outpatient rehab facilities are also available.
The National Institute on Drug Abuse states, “Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.” Addiction can result from a variety of factors and catalysts, including genetic predisposition, circumstances, environment, trauma and mental health disorders. While addiction often starts with drug abuse, it is not an indication of a person’s moral status or stability. In fact, many addictions spring from prescription drug use or casual use of legal substances.
Current clinical research suggests that marijuana use can have long-lasting effects on learning and memory, especially for users who start in adolescence, when the brain is still developing. Addiction Science & Clinical Practice states that approximately 9 percent of individuals who try marijuana become dependent on the drug, compared to 15 percent of cocaine users and 24 percent of heroin users. However, because marijuana is more readily available than these other illicit drugs, marijuana addiction has become more widespread, and marijuana detox programs have become more common.
It can be heartbreaking to realize that your loved one has a problem with alcohol. You want to do anything you can to help — but you’re afraid that if you speak up, you could destroy your relationship, or even drive your loved one deeper into addiction. At first, it’s much easier to deny the problem. But as time goes on and personal, financial, or legal problems increase, you’ll have to face the possibility that your loved one could have a substance use disorder. Learning to recognize the red flags of alcoholism could not only save your relationship, it could help you avoid a tragedy.

One of the brain areas still maturing during adolescence is the prefrontal cortex—the part of the brain that allows people to assess situations, make sound decisions, and keep emotions and desires under control. The fact that this critical part of a teen's brain is still a work in progress puts them at increased risk for making poor decisions, such as trying drugs or continuing to take them. Introducing drugs during this period of development may cause brain changes that have profound and long-lasting consequences. Transformations Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers
Determine the patient's readiness for change. Motivating a reluctant patient is one of the great challenges in treatment. To enhance the prospects of successful treatment, the clinician needs to have a basic concept of the stages of change. The 5 stages of change (Prochaska,) provide fundamental guidance for enhancing motivation. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment presents this concept in detail through a Treatment Improvement Protocol titled "Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment." The 5 stages of change are precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance. Specific strategies aligned with each of the 5 stages help a clinician motivate and prepare the patient for change. The 5 stages of change represent a cycle, permitting and explaining behavior that moves in both progressive and regressive directions.
According to The National Institute on Drug Abuse, of the estimated 22.5 million Americans classified as having a drug abuse or addiction problem, only about 4 million will receive the care they need to heal.1 If you or someone you care about struggles with drug dependence, don’t wait any longer to get help. Instead, contact us at Michael’s House today. We can discuss your options in rehabilitation and help you to choose the program that will be most effective for you. Call now.
Attend a support group, most of which are completely free. A supportive community of like-minded, recovery-focused peers can play an important role in your recovery. Alcoholics Anonymous is a free 12-step support group. Although members are not required to be religious, many of the steps involve the belief in divine being. Visit the official site of AA: Alcoholics Anonymous

Attend a support group, most of which are completely free. A supportive community of like-minded, recovery-focused peers can play an important role in your recovery. Alcoholics Anonymous is a free 12-step support group. Although members are not required to be religious, many of the steps involve the belief in divine being. Visit the official site of AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
It is always recommended that you join a fellowship group such as Narcotics Anonymous (NA) which can provide you with ongoing support and advice (as well as companionship) from others who have also experienced addiction and understand the challenges that you face day-to-day. Find out when and where such fellowship groups meet in your area and try to attend regularly and frequently at least in the months following your treatment and rehab; you may find that as time passes you need to attend meetings less frequently but they will always be a useful adjunct to any therapy that you may have on an ongoing basis as well as being invaluable if and when you feel the cravings which could derail your recovery.

Withdrawal can begin soon after the cessation of drug use and will likely peak in intensity in the first 24 to 48 hours. If severe withdrawal is left unchecked, in some instances it can be fatal. Anyone experiencing the symptoms of withdrawal should be under a doctor’s care, and for drug addicts entering treatment medical detox is often required before therapy for addiction can begin.
Most countries have legislation which brings various drugs and drug-like substances under the control of licensing systems. Typically this legislation covers any or all of the opiates, amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, anesthetics, hallucinogenics, derivatives and a variety of more modern synthetic drugs. Unlicensed production, supply or possession is a criminal offence.
What kind of counseling and community service programs is available through the Treatment Center?  Do they offer private, group, in-house, and outpatient (after-care) counseling services?  How much is the family involved in the therapeutic process?  What is the ratio of staff to patient load?  Are all staff located onsite?  How many beds does the Treatment Center contain?  Is the Treatment Center a fully licensed facility through the state?  Do all medical and counseling personnel hold credentials from nationally recognized schools?  How does one pay for treatment received from an In-House Center?
6. Finally, supportive social services – During this final step of alcohol rehabilitation, rehab staff help empower a patient by connecting her/him with services outside the treatment facility in order to maintain abstinence from alcohol and begin to create a network of supportive people to influence in the patients life. These services can include housing, health care, social service, child care, or financial and vocational counseling.
Drug addiction is a condition that is characterised by repeatedly taking or administering drugs - whether these are illegal drugs such as heroin, cocaine, or MDMA/ecstasy, or legal prescription drugs - to the extent that you become both physically and psychologically dependent on these substances. Regardless of the type of drug addiction that you have developed, continued drug use can soon become a serious problem and can lead to a range of serious long-term consequences, and may even be fatal.
Just as some people with diabetes or asthma may have flare-ups of their disease, a relapse to drinking can be seen as a temporary set-back to full recovery and not a complete failure. Seeking professional help can prevent relapse — behavioral therapies can help people develop skills to avoid and overcome triggers, such as stress, that might lead to drinking. Most people benefit from regular checkups with a treatment provider. Medications also can deter drinking during times when individuals may be at greater risk of relapse (e.g., divorce, death of a family member).
Treatments and attitudes toward addiction vary widely among different countries. In the US and developing countries, the goal of commissioners of treatment for drug dependence is generally total abstinence from all drugs. Other countries, particularly in Europe, argue the aims of treatment for drug dependence are more complex, with treatment aims including reduction in use to the point that drug use no longer interferes with normal activities such as work and family commitments; shifting the addict away from more dangerous routes of drug administration such as injecting to safer routes such as oral administration; reduction in crime committed by drug addicts; and treatment of other comorbid conditions such as AIDS, hepatitis and mental health disorders. These kinds of outcomes can be achieved without eliminating drug use completely. Drug treatment programs in Europe often report more favorable outcomes than those in the US because the criteria for measuring success are functional rather than abstinence-based.[24][25][26] The supporters of programs with total abstinence from drugs as a goal believe that enabling further drug use means prolonged drug use and risks an increase in addiction and complications from addiction.[27]
Withdrawal is medically supervised and supported by our on-site nurses. For certain cases, we make use of medical aids to render the process much easier and safer. For opiate withdrawals we use suboxone, and for Benzodiazepine withdrawal we follow a modified version of the Ashton protocol. Alcohol withdrawal is medically supervised and medication is given to eliminate the risk of seizure and stroke. We take every measure to ensure that this first, important stage towards drug addiction recovery is a comfortable and safe one. To find out more about the detox program at Searidge please call us at 1-866-777-9614. So... What is Rehab Like?
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